PDF Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries book. Happy reading Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Resource Curse or Blessing? Africas Management of its Extractive Industries Pocket Guide.
From Curse to Blessing: How Africa’s Natural Resources Can Build Peace
Contents:
  1. From Resource Curse to Blessing
  2. Growing importance of access to resources
  3. Resource curse
  4. Oil in Africa: Blessing or Curse? | Wilson Center

From Resource Curse to Blessing

Restore content access Restore content access for purchases made as guest. Article Purchase - Online Checkout. People also read Article. Deval Desai et al. Published online: 3 Jun Elissaios Papyrakis et al. Journal of Development Studies Volume 53, - Issue 2.

Growing importance of access to resources

Published online: 20 Apr Published online: 25 Aug Eduardo Canel et al. Published online: 14 Feb Michael Watts Geopolitics Volume 9, - Issue 1. Published online: 4 Jun Published online: 14 Apr More Share Options. This will also involve harmonizing with other laws like the taxation Act, freedom of information and Reviewing of the mineral legislation Publish timely, comprehensive reports on oil, gas and mining operations, including detailed revenue and contracts which government has entered with the industry.

The extractive industry sector and natural resources has been associated with a curse instead of a blessing for a lot of African countries and thus partly because of lack of transparency in the sector. If admitted, the candidate country is given a deadline to provide its first annual EITI report. Adopting the EITI principles requires consistent reporting on information pertaining to the extractives sector and disseminating the information to the public, thus making the commitment relevant to the OGP value of access to information.

Also, the involvement of civil society in the multi-stakeholder group would allow civil society to directly influence the way in which EITI is implemented in Malawi, thus making the commitment relevant to the OGP value of civic participation. The milestones for this commitment were completed in and , prior to the period covered in the first action plan.

Cookies and Privacy

A three-year work plan for implementing EITI requirements was developed and published in January The multi-stakeholder group is chaired by the Director of Revenue of the Ministry of Finance, Economic Planning and Development of Malawi and comprises 23 representatives: seven from Government Entities, eight from the extractive companies, and eight from civil society. During the first year of action plan implementation, Malawi further pursued compliancy with the EITI.

The report covered the oil, gas, mining and forestry sectors, and included 13 recommendations to improve the EITI process. The EITI process has already led to preliminary improvements in transparency around the extractives sector in Malawi.

Resource curse

Currently, five contracts are published in full on ResourceContracts. Obtaining EITI candidacy status is an important first step towards greater transparency in the extractives sector.


  • All sections.
  • Finding out Why I am Here.
  • LATEST ISSUE!

Because of their clear relevance to OGP values as written in the Open Data Policy, future action plans could incorporate these policy objectives and their corresponding implementation activities as the specific milestones in a new commitment. Public participation and accountability are important elements to ensure transparency in the extractives sector.

Malawi is currently in the process of reforming its Mines and Minerals Act of The commitment called on Malawi to begin the process of joining the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative EITI , a global standard to promote open and accountable management of natural resources. It also requires annual reporting of key information on the governance of the extractives sector and disseminating the findings and recommendations to the public.

The milestones for the commitment were implemented prior to the formal publication of the action plan. The Malawi government is currently promoting foreign investment in the extractive industries, with the goal for the extractive sector mining, oil and gas to reach 20 percent of GDP by All negotiated extractive contracts in Malawi are available on the resource contracts repository ReourceContracts. At the time of writing this report, there have been no new contracts negotiated since Therefore, the commitment has resulted in more publicly available information compared to status quo prior to the action plan period.

Oil in Africa: Blessing or Curse? | Wilson Center

While the establishment of the MSG is a positive development for civil society participation in the extractives sector, it was established prior to the start of the action plan, and thus civic participation is assessed as having not changed. The most recent compliancy assessment began in September , after the end date of the action plan.

Mr Grain Malunga, one member of MSG, felt that the only way the extractive industry can improve is through revisions to the Mines and Minerals Act and addressing issues related to transparency in handling mining contracts.

President Mutharika assented to the Mines and Minerals Act in February , after the reporting period for the action plan. Furthermore, stakeholders on the MSG still feel that some companies known to have made profits are not included in the EITI report and did not meet the reporting threshold as agreed by the MSG.

The CSOs acknowledged that the Bill improves public access to information but felt that it should be more explicit about what information is public and where it is accessed. At the time of writing this report, Malawi has not started development of the next action plan. MW, , Human Rights. MW, , Anti-Corruption Institutions. MW, , Capacity Building.